Posts Tagged ‘penalty’

OSHA Gets a Bigger Stick

On August 2, 2016, OSHA’s maximum penalties will increase by 78%. The penalty hike is the result of an interim final rule issued by the U.S. Department of Labor. The increase is intended to bring OSHA penalties, which have not been raised since 1990, in line with inflation.

Under the rule, serious and other than serious violations will now be capped at $12,471 per violation, rather than $7,000. Failure to abate violations, which are calculated on a per day basis, will receive an identical increase—$7,000 to $12,471. The cap on substantial penalties for repeated and willful violations increases from $70,000 per violation to $124,709.

These changes become effective for all citations beginning August 2, 2016. No matter when the violation occurred or when the investigation began, all OSHA penalties after August 1, 2016 will be calculated according to these new maximums.

OSHA’s 2015 Field Operations Manual remains the latest guidance as to how it determines an appropriate fine for violations. The primary consideration in determining penalty amounts is the “gravity of the violation,” which is determined by examining the severity of the injury that could have resulted from a violation, along with the probability that an injury could have occurred. It also allows for reductions in penalties depending on the employer’s size, whether the employer lacks a history of violations, and whether the employer was acting in good faith (i.e., wasn’t purposefully breaking the rules and had an effective safety and health management system in place).

Of course, the cheapest OSHA fine is the one never issued. Having a safety program in place and making sure that employees receive regular training on best safety practices is advisable. Companies should strive to create a culture in which safety always comes first—the increase in OSHA penalties is just one more reason why.

Violation Type Old Max Penalty New Max After August 1
Other than Serious $7,000 $12,471
Serious $7,000 $12,471
Failure to Abate $7,000 a day $12,471 a day
Repeat $70,000 $124,709
Willful $70,000 $124,709

What’s Happening Now . . .

  • The U.S. Economy grew at 1.2% for the second quarter of 2016.
  • Growth hasn’t topped 2% since the second quarter of 2015.
  • The second estimate for the second quarter will be released August 26, 2016.
  • In 2013 and 2014, quarterly growth exceeded 2% in 6 of 8 quarters.

Source: BEA, U.S. Dept. of Commerce, News Release, Nat. Income and Product Accounts  (July 29, 2016).

Newsletter written by Jeffrey C. Bright, Esq., an attorney licensed in Pennsylvania and Maryland.  For more information, contact an attorney at Harmon & Davies, P.C.

This Newsletter is not legal advice.  Unlike this Newsletter, legal advice is specifically tailored to the facts, law, and objectives unique to each circumstance.

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PA Workplace Misclassification Act

In March 2016 the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry produced a white paper report on the “Administration and Enforcement of the Construction Workplace Misclassification Act in 2015.” Under the Act, the DLI investigates and penalizes construction companies that misclassify employees as independent contractors.

Here’s a quick snapshot from the Report:

pic for 4-29-16 blog

But in 2013, under similar circumstances, the Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court held that the general contractor’s payments to the subcontractor did not afford protection, and the Prompt Payment Act did not shield the contractor and the surety from liability. Berks Products Corp. v. Arch Ins. Co., 72 A.3d 315.

Those are the cases of Workplace Misclassification that the Bureau of Labor Law Compliance has investigated in the past five years. Notably, there were more investigations in 2015 than the previous four years combined. Also, the investigations netted $217,450 in penalties, which is a 1,612% increase from the 2014 penalty amount. In fact, the Bureau only collected $12,700 in penalties in 2014. Point being, DLI is emphasizing the enforcement of this Act, and all construction companies should take a very close look at how they supply manpower to their projects.

The Workplace Misclassification Act applies to all construction companies working on all types of projects—public, private, residential, or commercial. The Act sets forth a checklist of considerations that are scrutinized when determining if a laborer on a project is actually an independent contractor. If the laborer is misclassified as an independent contractor—when in fact he is really an employee—DLI will levy a fine. In some instances, DLI has the authority to seek criminal prosecutions.

To comply with the Act, every independent contractor must have a written contract. Further, every laborer should be analyzed with consideration of the numerous other requirements under the Act. DLI generally receives its leads from (1) complaints filed by laborers; (2) findings made during construction site visits; and (3) referrals from other government agencies, particularly the Office of Unemployment Compensation Tax Services. To avoid penalties, it is best to review your laborers and seek legal advice as necessary.

What’s Happening Now . . .

11.2 % Increase

  • Increase in construction spending for first two months of year, comparing 2015 to 2016.
  • Construction spending for January & February 2015 was $141.3 billion.
  • Construction spending for January & February 2016 was $157.1 billion.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau News, February 2016 Construction at $1,144.0 Billion Annual Rate, U.S. Dept. of Commerce (Apr. 1, 2016).

Newsletter written by Jeffrey C. Bright, Esq. , an attorney licensed in Pennsylvania and Maryland. For more information, contact an attorney at Harmon & Davies, P.C.


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